Profile: Huma Mulji Artist Last Update:April 5, 2018

Arabian Delight, 2008, Rexine suitcase, taxidermy camel, metal rods, cotton wool and fabric, 41.5" (H) x 57" x 61" (105 cm x 144cm x 155cm). Installation documentation by David C. Alesworth.

Huma Mulji works with sculpture, photography, drawing, and painting, creating material juxtapositions which are attentive to the absurd, and question notions of certainty, and truth. Her works broadly address notions of failure and neglect, endurance and transformation. The deliberately awkward artworks are spatially evocative, and imbue an anti-heroism, playing out ironically, in her works.

Mulji’s participation in recent exhibitions includes Witness, Karachi Biennale 2017, “A country of Last Things” (solo), Koel Gallery, Karachi, 2016, “The Great Game”, Irani Pavillion, Venice Biennale, 2015, “Burning Down the House”, 10th Gwangju Biennale, South Korea, 2014, “Extra|Ordinary”, Dubai, 2013, “Twilight”, a solo show at Project 88, Mumbai, India, 2011, “The Rising Tide”, Mohatta Palace Museum, Karachi, 2010, “Where three Dreams Cross”. Whitechapel Gallery, London, UK, 2010, “Crystal Palace and Other Follies” (solo), Rohtas Gallery Lahore, 2010, “The Empire Strikes Back”, The Saatchi Gallery, 2010 and “Hanging Fire: Contemporary Art from Pakistan, at Asia Society, NY, 2009. Mulji was a recipient of the Abraaj Group Art Prize 2013.

She currently lives in Bristol, UK and is Lecturer, BA Hons. Fine Art, at Plymouth College of Art.

Selected Work

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Arabian Delight, 2008, Rexine suitcase, taxidermy camel, metal rods, cotton wool and fabric, 41.5 Lost and Found, 2012, Buffalo hide on fiberglass and mixed media, 45 Ode to a Tubelight, 2011, mixed media, silicon lizards, and enamel paint on canvas, 72 Summer Afternoons Bedroom, Kitchen, Lounge, 2010, laser cut acrylic sheet, steel, adhesives, 48” x 96” x 1.5
Ode to Lamppost that got accidentally destroyed in the enthusiastic widening of Canal Bank Road, 2017, welded metal pipes, steel brackets, electric cables, LED lights, electronic timing circuit, insulators and mixed media, dimensions varialbe. Documentation by the artist. Heavenly Heights, 2009, taxidermy Buffalo, welded steel, powder coated cteel, ceramic insulators and electric cable, 171” x 74” x 118” (434.3 cm x 188 cm x 300 cm). Documentation by the artist. Housing Scheme, 2008, C Type print, 40 Study of Equilibrium (detail), 2015, suite of 21 works Archival inkjet prints on Hahnemühle Photorag, acrylic paint and etched metal, 14 in x 11 in each ( 35 cm x 28 cm), variable ed 3 + 1 ap. Documentation by the artist.
Study of Equilibrium (detail), 2015, suite of 21 works Archival inkjet prints on Hahnemühle Photorag, acrylic paint and etched metal, 14 in x 11 in each ( 35 cm x 28 cm), variable ed 3 + 1 ap. Documentation by the artist. The Flight, 2014-2016, plastic chair, taxidermy Sparrow, mixed media, approx. 35

Words

2015
Hashmi, Salima, Khosla, Martand (Authors). The Eye Still Seeks: Pakistani Contemporary Art. Penguin Studio, 2015.

2014
Morgan, Jessica. Burning down the House, 10th Gwangju Biennale, South Korea

2013
Noyce, Richard. Ed. Printmaking off the Beaten Track, UK
Vali, Murtaza, Ed. Extra-Ordinary, Catalogue for Abraaj Group Art Prize 2013, Dubai, UAE
Baler, Pablo. The Next Thing: Art in the Twenty-first Century. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers with Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, USA

2010
Khan, Naiza H., ed. The Rising Tide: New Directions in Art From Pakistan, 1990-2010. Karachi: Mohatta Palace Museum.
Where Three Dreams Cross: 150 Years of Photography from India, Pakistan & Bangladesh, Göttingen: Steidl; London: Whitechapel Gallery; Winterthur: Fotomuseum Winterthur.
Rana, Rashid, ed. Resemble/Reassemble. New Delhi: Devi Art Foundation.
Sullivan, Graeme. Art Practice as Research: Inquiry in Visual Arts. Los Angeles: Sage Publications.

2009
Holborn, Mark, ed. The Empire Strikes Back: Indian Art Today. London: Jonathan Cape in association with Saatchi Gallery.
Hashmi, Salima, ed. Hanging Fire: Contemporary Art From Pakistan. New York: Asia Society Museum; New Haven: Yale University Press.
Chiu, Melissa and Genocchio, Benjamin. Asian Art Now, 2010
Malik, Maha. High Rise, Elementa Gallery, Dubai, UAE

2008
Gao, Shiming, Sarat Maharaj and Tsongzung Chang, eds. The Third Guangzhou Triennial: Farewell to Post-Colonialism. Guangzhou: China Academy of Art Press.
Tuqan, Salma, ed. Desperately Seeking Paradise. Dubai: Art Dubai.
Boonimitra, Sopawan.Talkin’ Loud, Sayin’ Something, Four Perspectives of Artistic Research, ArtMonitor, No.4. pp. 28.

2007
Dalmia, Yashodhara, and Salima Hashmi. Memory, Metaphor, Mutations: Contemporary Art of India and Pakistan. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.

2005
Doshi, Saryu and Quddus Mirza, eds. Beyond Borders: Art from Pakistan. Mumbai: Young Presidents’ Organization. 2006

2006
Bonacossa, Ilaria and Francesco Manacorda, ed. SubContingent: The Indian Subcontinent in Contemporary Art. Florence: Electa; Turin: Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo.

2002
Hashmi, Salima. Unveiling the Visible: Lives and Works of Women Artists of Pakistan. Islamabad: ActionAid Pakistan.

2000
Wilcox, Timothy, ed. Pakistan: Another Vision. London: Arts & The Islamic World (UK) Ltd.

SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY

2017
Rizvi, Dua Abbas. How cities and urbanisation have become favoured subjects for artistic expressions, The Herald, December 2017.
Hussain, Jahanzeb. Alvi, Asad. Does a City like Karachi even need a biennale, Dawn blog, November, 2017
Zubair, Hamna. How an exhibit at the Karachi Biennale stirred up a storm in a pre-partition bookshop, Dawn Images, November 2017.
Mirza, Quddus. Ijtima of Art, The News on Sunday, September 2017.

Links / Updates

Artist’s Website:
www.humamulji.com

Represented by Project 88, Mumbai, India

CDCC Exhibitions/Events/Publications