How do you die smarter? In the exhibition DIYing Free, artist Justin Tyler-Tate suggests you D-I-Y

Taboo Health, DIYing Free, installation with Design TO Festival at Critical Distance Centre for Curators, 2019.

An exhibition of a do-it-yourself cardboard coffin seeks to turn death into a sustainable enterprise through design, technology, and open source methods while daring you to get comfortable with the uncomfortable. Come on in and stay a while, for this is a unique chance for the living to get cozy with one of life’s certainties…death.

In 2008 in the US alone, 1.8 million bodies were buried in coffins that resulted in the approximate disposal of 1,632,932 kilograms of material, not including the energy used in the processing of the materials for those coffins, such as shipping, labor, manufacturing, finishing, et cetera. In this speculative project, we ask: Can we promote a process of death which uses design, recycled materials, and technology for a more ecological practice of grieving?

Grim or enlightening? Curious or distasteful? You make your call at this quirky installation that is presented as a part of Taboo Health’s exhibition series, Dying. , for DesignTO Festival.

This special exhibition is brought to you by Taboo Health and OCAD University’s Design Studio.

EXHIBITION DATES January 18 to 27, 2019

OPENING RECEPTION Please join us for the opening reception of DIYing Free on Thursday, Jan 17, from 6–9pm.

Please see the Taboo Health website for more information on Dying., and more exhibition details of DIYing Free. http://taboohealthexhibitions.com/

Artscape Youngplace and Critical Distance is fully accessible by Ontario standards, with a wheelchair ramp at the 180 Shaw Street doors, an elevator servicing every floor and a fully accessible washroom on every level. The nearby 63 Ossington bus on the TTC is wheelchair accessible. Admission is free as always, and all are welcome.

LOCATION
Critical Distance
Suite 302 at Artscape Youngplace (take elevator or stairs to 3rd Floor)
180 Shaw Street btw Dundas and Queen Street in Toronto’s Queen West neighborhood.
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