Category:Annual Program

2019 Programming Update

2019 Programming Update with book covers

In the new year Critical Distance will be welcoming visitors during our new gallery hours. We are open Wednesday to Friday 12-6 pm, Saturday and Sunday 11-5 pm, and by appointment during exhibitions. Unless otherwise noted, we are open on holiday weekends during exhibitions and closed for installation between shows. We encourage you to confirm exhibition dates before making the trip, and hope to see you soon!

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Opening | September 13 | Through lines

Curated by Noa Bronstein and presented in partnership with the Koffler Gallery, Through Lines brings together the works of seven artists that challenge notions of redaction, tackling its typical devices of shredding, blacking out, editing and covering up. Lise Beaudry, Scott Benesiinaabandan, Michèle Pearson Clarke, Leila Fatemi, Maria Hupfield, Raafia Jessa, and Nadia Myre create works that engage a restorative gesture, speaking to the ways in which history and memory are conceptualized within a contemporary context.  Continue reading

Opening | August 11 | Exposing Liminalities

Gallery 44 and Critical Distance presents Exposing Liminalities, an exhibition which brings together the work of five artists that expand, challenge, and question notions of the in-between. Employing elements of both analogue and digital photography practices, this exhibition considers the myriad intersections that can define oneself. Reflecting on liminality as a critical discourse, artists probe places and contexts that are immediate yet deeply personal – embodying and responding to conditions that approximate liminal space through investigative means.

Curated by emerging curator Emma German, Exposing Liminalities features alumni from Gallery 44’s OUTREACH program, and winners and honourable mentions of the David Barker Maltby Award. Continue reading

Opening | June 23 | … move or be moved by some ‘thing’ rather than oneself.

Nadege Grebmeier Forget

Critical Distance is pleased to present … move or be moved by some thing rather than oneself., an exhibition that considers curating and choreography as materials and subjects. Bringing together the work of Guillaume Adjutor Provost, Adam Basanta, Adrienne Crossman, and Nadège Grebmeier Forget, the exhibition is curated by Florence-Agathe Dubé-Moreau and Maude Johnson. The title, taken from a quote by choreographer Yvonne Rainer, echoes the curators’ desire to question the potentialities of artworks as well as presentation contexts from the position of transdisciplinary instability. Continue reading

Workshop | April 22 | Make Your Own Bike Tube Flogger with Dayna Danger

Bike Tube Flogger Making with Dayna Danger
Make your own mini flogger from rubber bike tubes in this hands-on workshop with Dayna Danger, who will be here from Montreal for FORWARD FACING‘s opening weekend. Workshop is PWYC, and materials will be provided.

Date and Location
Sunday, April 22 from 2-4 pm
Artscape Youngplace
180 Shaw Street, Toronto, ON M6J 2W5

To Register
Even though this workshop is PWYC, space is limited so pre-registration is required.
Please contact us at rsvp (at) criticaldistance (dot) ca to inquire/register.

Location within Youngplace to be confirmed upon registration. Continue reading

Opening | April 21 | FORWARD FACING | Exhibition presented in partnership with ACC-CCA

In partnership with Aboriginal Curatorial Collective–Collectif des commissaires autochtones, Critical Distance is pleased to present FORWARD FACING, a Featured Exhibition of the 2018 Scotiabank CONTACT Photography Festival. Curated by Cass Gardiner (Toronto/Brooklyn), FORWARD FACING is an exhibition that examines intersectionality within Indigenous identity through the photographic, video, craft, and installation practices of Dayna Danger (Montreal), Lacie Burning (Vancouver), and Jade Nasogaluak Carpenter (Calgary).


Opening Weekend Events

Saturday, April 21 from 2-4 pm
FORWARD FACING Reception with Curator’s Talk
Please join us in the gallery (Suite 302 at Artscape Youngplace) for a very special reception with Toronto/Brooklyn-based curator Cass Gardiner, featuring a tour of the exhibition followed by beverages and bites courtesy of Pow Wow Cafe. Stay for artists’ performance at 5 pm.

Saturday, April 21 starting at 5 pm
Performance featuring DAYNA DANGER, LACIE BURNING, and KANDACE PRICE
Three collaborators negotiate time, boundaries, and songs. Starting location to be announced at the opening.

Sunday, April 22 from 2-4 pm
Bike Tube Flogger-Making Workshop with DAYNA DANGER
Make your own mini flogger from rubber bike tubes in this PWYC hands-on workshop with Dayna Danger.  Materials will be provided. Space is limited so please contact us at rsvp (at) criticaldistance (dot) ca to inquire/register. Location to be confirmed upon registration.

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CDCC+SAVAC Present: We Look At Animals Because, curated by Toleen Touq and Nahed Mansour

WE LOOK AT ANIMALS BECAUSE
January 25–March 25, 2018

Featuring Quratulain Butt, Khaled Hourani, Maha Maamoun, Smriti Mehra, Huma Mulji, Ed Panar, Alex Sheriff, and Andrea Luka Zimmerman | Curated by Toleen Touq and Nahed Mansour

In partnership with South Asian Visual Arts Centre (SAVAC), Critical Distance is pleased to present We Look At Animals Because, an exhibition that gazes on animality. Through the lens of spectatorship, the show explores the shifting ways in which animals are regarded, represented and accorded meaning in post-industrial landscapes. Exhibiting photographs, video, works on paper, and sculpture, the featured artists reveal the nuanced, complicated and unexpected paradoxes that mark our relationships with cosmopolitan animals.

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ACC+CDCC Call for Proposals: Indigenous Curatorial Projects at Critical Distance

Critical Distance Centre for Curators (CDCC) and Aboriginal Curatorial Collective–Collectif des commissaires autochtones (ACC-CCA) are pleased to announce this joint call for proposals for an exhibition or curatorial project to be mounted at CDCC in Spring 2018.

This opportunity is for Indigenous curators, artists, architects, collectives, writers, researchers, and others interested in engaging and expanding curatorial approaches to public programming and exhibition-making within a critical context. Projects that are conceptually experimental or innovative, introduce new artists to Toronto audiences, and deliver theoretical tools to think about contemporary Indigenous art in Canada are highly encouraged.

The selected applicant will receive a curatorial fee of $3000 for curation and writing in support of the project. Artist fees will be paid at 2018 CARCC rates. Further support in the form of a budget for exhibition materials and production (to be developed in collaboration with ACC-CCA/CDCC), installation assistance, design, promotion, and full documentation in an exhibition catalogue to be produced by CDCC will also be provided.

Submission Deadline
Friday, October 27, 2017 at 5 pm EST

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CDCC FALL EXHIBITION: Fermenting Feminism | Sharlene Bamboat, Hazel Meyer, Leila Nadir and Cary Peppermint, Sarah Nasby, Kayla Polan, Walter Scott, Agustine Zegers, curated by Lauren Fournier

Critical Distance is thrilled to launch our landmark 5th year of programming with FERMENTING FEMINISM, curated by Lauren Fournier and featuring Sharlene Bamboat, Hazel Meyer, Leila Nadir and Cary Peppermint, Sarah Nasby, Kayla Polan, Walter Scott, and Agustine Zegers.

Kombucha, guts, bacteria, vessels, vitalism, effervescence, degradation, and decay. Fermenting Feminism brings together artists whose work fleshes out the intersections between fermentation and intersectional feminisms. As the process of microbial transformation, fermentation becomes both a metaphor and material practice through which to approach feminist practices in the contemporary. Continue reading

Opening Thursday: SIGNALS & SENTIMENTS, A Featured Exhibition of the 2017 CONTACT Photography Festival

Critical Distance is pleased to present Signals & Sentiments, a two-part exhibition that examines how gesture functions as a mechanism for the production of identity. In CDCC’s third floor gallery, Signals & Sentiments takes the form of an intimate group show for which five Toronto-based artists, Sebastián BenítezPetar BoskovicShelby FenlonMaxwell Hyett, and Mickey Mackenna, consider the inner workings of the gestural urge. Placing a varied selection of sculpture and photo-based objects in context with each other, exhibition curator Katelyn Gallucci investigates how seemingly divergent artistic gestures might fundamentally derive from inadequacies of language, disposition, desire, and whim.

In Artscape Youngplace’s expansive stairwell spaces, three site-specific installations address the more exterior and transitory dynamics of gesture. Extending themes of self-discovery, the relationship between perception and memory, and the search for emotional connection through time, these encompassing spatial interventions by Maggie Groat and Jimmy Limit (working in collaboration), Karen Henderson, and Josée Pedneault condition the viewer’s bodily response as much as they embody gestural acts and intentions themselves.

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