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CDCC FALL EXHIBITION: Fermenting Feminism | Sharlene Bamboat, Hazel Meyer, Leila Nadir and Cary Peppermint, Sarah Nasby, Kayla Polan, Walter Scott, Agustine Zegers, curated by Lauren Fournier

Critical Distance is thrilled to launch our landmark 5th year of programming with FERMENTING FEMINISM, curated by Lauren Fournier and featuring Sharlene Bamboat, Hazel Meyer, Leila Nadir and Cary Peppermint, Sarah Nasby, Kayla Polan, Walter Scott, and Agustine Zegers.

Kombucha, guts, bacteria, vessels, vitalism, effervescence, degradation, and decay. Fermenting Feminism brings together artists whose work fleshes out the intersections between fermentation and intersectional feminisms. As the process of microbial transformation, fermentation becomes both a metaphor and material practice through which to approach feminist practices in the contemporary. Continue reading

Critical Kombucha and Dirty Soap: Fermenting Feminism Reading Group

Can a Kombucha Workshop be Intersectional? Can a Feminist Live off the Grid? And Other
Fermenting Feminism Questions

Please join us for a tour, curatorial talk, and reading group facilitated by Fermenting Feminism curator Lauren Fournier

Saturday, November 4th from 3-5 pm
Refreshments will be served

Fermenting Feminism is a group exhibition at Critical Distance featuring work by Sharlene Bamboat, Hazel Meyer, Leila Nadir and Cary Peppermint, Sarah Nasby, Kayla Polan, Walter Scott, and Agustine Zegers. Together with exhibition curator Lauren Fournier, workshop participants will discuss of some of the themes related to the Fermenting Feminism project, including what it means to “ferment feminism” today and the politics, aesthetics, and ethics of incorporating fermentation practices into feminist life. Following a brief curatorial tour and talk, the group will come together to discuss some of the key problems raised by Fermenting Feminism that the three readings — one academic article and two shorter texts — flesh out from Black, POC, and trans feminist frameworks, including issues of exit and escape, community, and vibrant life.

The workshop is free but limited to 15 participants — please RSVP to info (at) criticaldistance (dot) ca to reserve your spot. Workshop location will be in a third floor studio at Artscape Youngplace adjacent to Critical Distance, all spaces are accessible. PDFs of the readings will be pre-circulated beforehand to those who are attending.

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FERMENTING FEMINISM

September 14–November 26, 2017

Critical Distance is thrilled to launch our landmark 5th year of programming with FERMENTING FEMINISM, curated by Lauren Fournier and featuring Sharlene Bamboat, Hazel Meyer, Leila Nadir and Cary Peppermint, Sarah Nasby, Kayla Polan, Walter Scott, and Agustine Zegers.

Kombucha, guts, bacteria, vessels, vitalism, effervescence, degradation, and decay. Fermenting Feminism brings together artists whose work fleshes out the intersections between fermentation and intersectional feminisms. As the process of microbial transformation, fermentation becomes both a metaphor and material practice through which to approach feminist practices in the contemporary. Is feminism a relic of the past, something that has soured? Or is feminism still a vital imperative? This exhibition positions fermentation as a vital and viable space to re-conceive feminisms’s pasts, presents, and futures. Continue reading

Fall 2017 Billboard on Shaw, "Living Things" (Eva Zeisel vessel, kombucha, lines pattern) by Sarah Nasby, from Fermenting Feminism, curated by Lauren Fournier, Critical Distance Centre for Curators, 2017. Installation documentation by Toni Hafkenscheid.

Billboard on Shaw: Sarah Nasby | Living Things

September–December 2017

In partnership with Artscape Youngplace, Critical Distance is pleased to present the Fall 2017 Billboard on Shaw, featuring an image by Sarah Nasby, curated by Lauren Fournier.

Fermentation requires vessels to hold and contain its transformative processes. In her Living Things series, Toronto-based artist Sarah Nasby takes vessels designed by women throughout history and re-stages them in light of fermentation as both a practice and a metaphor. Here, a vessel designed by Hungarian-born American designer Eva Zeisel is filled with kombucha, a fermented tea. Nasby graphically interprets the vitality of the kombucha tonic and the undulating design of Zeisel’s pot with her own squiggle pattern, creating a work that is both elegant and excessive in its form. The objects become living things in more than one sense: vessels that we live with, and vessels containing living, bubbling matter. Continue reading